My Last Valentine in Beirut: The Review

My Last Valentine in Beirut: The Review

Again as a reminder, we’re no movie reviewers, but we’re writing this post from a visual perspective. 

By Admin I : To be honest, I’ve never been a fan of Selim el Turk’s earlier attempts and I have nothing against the earlier Lebanese film-making experiences, but what ‘My last Valentine in Beirut’ offers is highly different. The movie is nothing like what you have seen before; this time, there’s no waxing stories or Islamo-christian melodrama; the content is a pure satirical approach that makes you lost between two scenarios: A: the director has too much money that he decided to fool around and set his own rules (highly doubtful), or B: we should man up as Lebanese visual artists and start having some balls, going experimental and caring less about the box office or the international feedback.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m one of the few who proudly state their ‘w halla’ lawen’ love story, but ‘my last Valentine in Beirut’ just took me on a ride to the absurd. The movie is indeed a visual risk, a game that could easily end in the trap of the ‘sex sells’ and the cliches connotations, but gladly it doesn’t. The movie is an interesting piece of crap (in a positive way) that pokes fun of the film-making and audio-visual industry in Lebanon, and if you have missed the point then the whole thing is not really addressed to you.

A smart story-line playing in the midst of a visual chaos that reaches a moral without being too preachy; in the end ‘Juliette’ – the lead character – proves that we are all whores, from different backgrounds and for different reasons.

“My last Valentine in Beirut” is totally worth seeing if you belong to an audience that gets layered visual approaches and cherishes the huge need for imagination, actualization and self-criticism.

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8 comments
  1. EsteemedAdCritic said:

    Haven’t seen the movie yet, but I’m already sickened by the hysterically prudish reactions. Funnily enough, no one seems to mind the sex and nudity in Almodovar’s or Van Trier’s films. They are screened in art schools.and widely revered as masterpieces. But when a Lebanese director slightly pushes the boundaries, all hell breaks loose on him.

    Props to Salim El Turk for steering off the civil war cliches and to those who object to the film on moral grounds but are hypocrite enough to watch it, I hope some sense prevails over your dumb minds.

  2. josef said:

    I have seen it and was entertained by the unexpected scenario.

  3. assaad said:

    thanks for the support

    toucher

  4. HishamAD said:

    I’ll be watching it because of your point of view. Then I’ll develop my own opinion and get back to you

    • Admin I said:

      Would love to read your opinion whenever you watch it 🙂

  5. nash j said:

    So now ill be going to see this! i’ll always support any Lebanese visual that doesn’t kiss the European standards of film making!

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